Whether you are working on poverty reduction, mental health or environmental issues, there are hundreds of organisations and enterprises out there doing similar work and releasing communication materials of their own. It can feel overwhelming to be bombarded with so many numbers, statistics, and reports—especially when many people find it easier to tune out. So, how can we keep our audience’s attention? How can we tell stories that convince them to care?

How can the founders of social enterprises sustain their purpose throughout organisational growth? It’s a question that encompasses so many factors that it’s hard to pin down any answers. In this post, Alessandra Wulf explores some of the strategies, approaches and solutions for maintaining a sense of purpose on the job. These 6 strategies are helpful to consider when you are under stress or are struggling to identify and maintain focus on your sense of purpose.

While every business idea and angel investor vary in different contexts, there are foundational elements that remain the same. At the core, these are what investors are looking for, and they are, therefore, what you should be mastering and incorporating into your social enterprise and pitches to win them over. Here’s some of the most effective ways to persuade an angel investors for buying into your social enterprise.

Although we’re living in unprecedented times and every path is unique, we found that some lessons come in handy over and over again. News and stress about the coronavirus from around the world are creating significant uncertainty among leaders, employees and customers. Beyond common sense measures, we wanted to provide a list of practical tips, tactics and strategies to help you make quick and needed decisions to help you navigate through these stormy times.

Pandemics like the H1N1 influenza of 2009 have not only set the stage for novel approaches to public health concerns, but have joined the global financial crisis in welcoming new entrepreneurial activities that address both economic and societal concerns. The outbreak of COVID-19 is affecting our lives as social enterprise founders, managers, funders, and volunteers—and it will continue to do so in several ways.

Where social entrepreneurs and social impact workers have been aware of systemic inequalities that have existed for decades, the emergence of coronavirus has made these clearer for the rest of the world. COVID-19 has presented the world with a new look at how individuals or certain groups are exposed to health crises, food shortages, job insecurity, and more. It is becoming increasingly clear outside the social enterprise sector that social impact entrepreneurs and companies are needed in this space.

Whether within local communities, nationally or globally, social entrepreneurs are dogged changemakers who put the needs of the ordinary citizens above financial gains but understand the need to be financially sustainable to scale their solution to more people. While a lot is known about what it takes to run a successful for-profit business, little is known about how a social changemaker navigates life as a business person.

Juanita Pope from Justice Connect has many vivid memories of the Social Enterprise World Forum 2019 in Ethiopia – the people, the dancing, the camaraderie, the incredible stories of entrepreneurs pushing against the odds to create impressive social impact. But the one thing that really struck a chord was the structural and systemic aspirations of many social enterprises speaking at SEWF.